AJW Technique Expanding Repair Capabilities In June

AJW Technique plans to have component repair and overhaul capability for at least 550 part numbers by June, with nearly 400 more targeted to be ready by October. Capabilities will cover avionics and instruments; fuel, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems, and electrical and generator components for Airbus and Boeing aircraft. With this number of stock-keeping units, the company—which only officially opened in early April—plans to process more than 25,000 repair units, covering 80% of component and powerplant ATA chapters per year.

AJW Technique plans to have component repair and overhaul capability for at least 550 part numbers by June, with nearly 400 more targeted to be ready by October. Capabilities will cover avionics and instruments; fuel, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems, and electrical and generator components for Airbus and Boeing aircraft. With this number of stock-keeping units, the company—which only officially opened in early April—plans to process more than 25,000 repair units, covering 80% of component and powerplant ATA chapters per year.

The new 160,000-sq.-ft. component repair facility in Montreal, which was built using former Aveos Fleet Performance assets acquired in October 2012, provides the U.K.-based parts company with a springboard into the North American market, which functions differently than the one in Europe. “This market is more comfortable with reduced turnaround times than pools,” which the European market embraces to a greater degree, says Boris Wolstenholme, CEO of AJ Walter Aviation.

Wolstenholme says the North American division currently only contributes 15% of the group’s $400 million in annual revenue, but he sees revenues from the Americas increasing by three times over the next three years.

“Technique is now the jewel in the crown,” because “it will take us to a different place in the market” due to a higher level of engagement with major carriers, he says. “Instead of being perceived as one of five major component suppliers, we now have repair capabilities to engage customers,” he adds.

AJ Walter Aviation doesn’t want the Technique facility in Montreal to be viewed as a backshop to its primary business. “We want to be viewed as the leading component maintenance shop in Montreal—then draw on the synergies of the company and provide more effective supply chain management and tear-down capabilities” for more efficient solutions, says Greg Martin, vice president of commercial and sales for AJW Technique.

The repair capability, located in Montreal—the third-largest aerospace hub behind Toulouse and Seattle—situates the company in an area with lots of technical talent. The company employs 27 repair and 16 support personnel, but hopes to expand that to 100 by year-end, says Martin.

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