engine-ge-aviation-predix.jpg.crop_display GE Reports, http://www.gereports.com/lets-get-connected-ge-digital-chief-bill-ruh-talks-intelligent-machines-optimized-future/

Easing Data Flow Goal Of New GE, Teledyne Partnership

Teledyne Controls and GE Aviation have signed a strategic partnership that should simplify the flow of flight data off aircraft, and expand its value through GE’s cloud-based platform that can extract greater value.

SAN FRANCISCO—Teledyne Controls and GE Aviation have signed a strategic partnership that should simplify the flow of flight data off aircraft, and expand its value through GE’s cloud-based platform that can extract greater value.

Aircraft generate 3–10 MB of data per flight-hour, and engines generate up to 25 MB, but right now the value of a lot of it is not utilized. The partnership is designed to use Teledyne GroundLink technology, which uses higher bandwidth and transfers data via wireless cellular networks, so it’s less expensive than the Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS), to flow data into GE’s Predix cloud-based platform for deeper analytics.

It can cost about $100 to transmit 1 MB of data via ACARS, compared to a fraction of a cent via wireless cellular, said Willie Cecil, Teledyne Control’s director of business development, wireless and data automation solutions. ACARS also is not useful to collect big volumes of data.

“Customers want to know the value of the data,” but to scale the data you need to get it off the aircraft and into the cloud for analytics, sad John Nelson, data product manager for GE Aviation, on the sideline of GE’s Mind + Machines event here.

[CHARTBEAT:3]

The partnership was logical because Teledyne’s GroundLink technology is equipped on more than half of Boeing’s in-service aircraft and about 70% of the Airbus fleet—about 10,000 aircraft. “There has been a move to wirelessly enabled aircraft because it eliminates manual downloads,” Cecil said.

The partnership focuses on making the data flow more simply off the aircraft, enriching it with other sources to provide more value and quickening the process of delivering the value to the operators, Nelson said. Initially the partnership will focus on post-flight data collection for GE engine-powered aircraft data, with real-time data collection later. “There is still a lot of value to be gained from post-flight data collection,” capturing the low-hanging fruit that is easy to gain, Nelson said.

The companies are starting pilot programs with GE customers that use Teledyne Control equipment and agree to flow the data into Predix for analysis. A second later step will involve building digital capabilities so airlines can view and analyze their own data.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish