Low Temperatures Behind 787 Battery Fault?

The Japan Transport Safety Board (JSTB) has found that 2013’s cold winter conditions may have caused the grounding of the 787.

The Japan Transport Safety Board (JSTB) has found that 2013’s cold winter conditions may have caused the grounding of the 787.

According to Japanese media, a draft report from the JSTB claims that extreme temperatures were the most likely cause of a lithium-ion battery malfunction on an All Nippon Airways (ANA) aircraft.

In January 2013, ANA’s 787 was flying between Japan’s Yamaguchi-Ube Airport and Tokyo Haneda when its cockpit instrumentation indicated a battery malfunction. The aircraft was subsequently forced to make an emergency landing.

The incident came just days after the US National Transportation Safety Board launched an investigation into the causes of a fire aboard a Japan Airlines 787 parked at Boston Logan Airport. Responding to growing concerns, authorities grounded the global fleet of 787s for three months.

Having spoken with aviation experts, the media outlet claimed that low temperatures could break down the battery’s liquid electrolytes, raising the risk of a short circuit. It’s believed that the JSTB will release its final report in the coming months.

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