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Pratt & Whitney Expands Engine Capabilities In Asia

Pratt & Whitney is shifting some of its aftermarket capabilities in Asia-Pacific, in part due to the ramp up of the geared turbofan engine.

Pratt & Whitney is shifting some of its aftermarket capabilities in Asia-Pacific, in part due to the ramp up of the geared turbofan engine.

It expects to overhaul its first PW1000G, for the Bombardier CSeries, in Singapore in 2020, but “we are very much evaluating the network,” says Kevin Kirkpatrick, Pratt & Whitney executive director aftermarket operations, Asia. The OEM has solid plans “but we are constantly evaluating those plans and what’s best for customers, so you could see that 2020 date move up.”

Its Singapore facility also plans to add GP7200 engine capability, which is a logical move because its two primary engine overhaul types here are the PW4000 and GE90. When “you look at the GE90 and PW4000,” by putting them together, “that’s what the GP7200 is,” a derivative of the two, says Kirkpatrick, “so it makes sense to bring in that engine.” 

P&W Singapore has completed some low pressure compressor (LPC) modules for training and plans to induct the first module in the fourth quarter. “We will be fully operational on the LPC next year,” when P&W expects to induct its first GP7000 engine for overhaul, he says.

In China, P&W’s JV with China Eastern intends to expand beyond CFM56 MRO and add V2500 overhaul capability in the fourth quarter 2017. Kirkpatrick says most V2500 overhauls will come from power by the hour contracts, including those from China Eastern.

While Pratt expected a dip of 6-7% marketshare in PW4000 work due to decreased flying from this mature product, Kirkpatrick says the Singapore shop has actually seen a 5% increase last year and this year. He attributes this Pratt & Whitney Eagle focusing on decreasing operator costs for the PW4000—including tailored workscopes--which has increased its marketshare. 

In addition, the bump in PW4000 throughput also is coming from MROs retooling and dropping PW4000 capacity to focus on newer types, as well as airlines such as All Nippon Airways, Asiana and Malaysian Airlines that used to service their own PW4000 engines and are now outsourcing their engines to the OEM. 

Pratt & Whitney says there are 3,000 active engines on more than 1,000 aircraft, including the Boeing 747, 767, 777-200LR/-300ER, MD-11, Airbus A300, A310 and A330.

TAGS: Asia Pacific
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