Review Of FAA Oversight Of Unapproved Aircraft Parts Begin

The Office of Inspector General is initiating an audit of the FAA’s oversight of Suspected Unapproved Parts for the aviation industry. The audit follows a request in March from the ranking members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Subcommittee on Aviation. The members are concerned about the risks the unapproved parts present to aviation safety.

The Office of Inspector General is initiating an audit of the FAA’s oversight of Suspected Unapproved Parts for the aviation industry. 

The audit follows a request in March from the ranking members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Subcommittee on Aviation. The members are concerned about the risks the unapproved parts present to aviation safety. 

Suspected Unapproved Parts are aircraft parts that are suspected of being manufactured without FAA approval or counterfeit parts that have been intentionally misrepresented. “The safety of the flying public depends on the Federal Aviation Administration and the aviation industry ensuring that all parts installed on aircraft are approved for flight and properly maintained,” said Charles Ward, Assistant Inspector General for Aviation Audits, in an announcement of the audit. 

The audit’s objective is to assess the effectiveness of the FAA’s process for monitoring and investigating suspected unapproved parts and the oversight of industry actions to remove the unapproved parts from the aviation supply chain, Ward said.

Since 2007, the FAA has issued 70 notifications related to unapproved parts to the aviation industry. In the past five years, the DOT has investigated 118 cases, which resulted in 63 indictments and 51 convictions, it said. 

The audit will begin this month and be conducted at FAA headquarters, selected regional offices, Flight Standards District Offices and Manufacturing Inspection District Offices. 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish