EASA’s new compilation of continuing airworthiness rules includes all the annexes of Regulation (EU) No 1321/2014 (i.e., Part-M, Part-145, Part-66, Part-147 and Part-T). ESA

EASA Provides “Easy Access” Rules for Continuing Airworthiness

By making all regulations and updates available online, EASA strives to improve accessibility and compliance.

Printed headline: One Source

European Aviation Safety Agency’s (EASA) stakeholders rejoice—the agency has finished the first part of a 10-phase project that will ultimately create a single, electronic source for all regulations applicable to users of European airspace. EASA’s eRules aim to create an efficient and reliable interface for users to access EASA regulations, acceptable means of compliance and guidance material.

The agency dubs the new system “aviation rules for the 21st century” and states that it will be a comprehensive, single system for the drafting, sharing and storing of rules, “offer[ing] easy [online] access to all rules and regulations as well as new and innovative applications such as rulemaking process automation, stakeholder consultation, cross-referencing, and comparison with [International Civil Aviation Organization] and third countries’ standards.”

EASA eRules’ first publication, Easy Access Rules for Continuing Airworthiness (Regulation [EU] No 1321/2014), was released Jan. 20. At 707 pages, the document doesn’t quite live up to its name, but it does in fact allow users to review regulation and guidance side-by-side in a color-coded format, vastly improving accessibility to continuing airworthiness rules.

ESA

EASA’s new compilation of continuing airworthiness rules includes all the annexes of Regulation (EU) No 1321/2014 (i.e., Part-M, Part-145, Part-66, Part-147 and Part-T). Credit: EASA

In the past 15 months, EASA has published “easy access” consolidated rules governing air traffic controllers, initial airworthiness, aircrews and operations. The most recent continuing airworthiness publication is the first “powered by eRules,” which will ultimately integrate to an online platform, expected to be completed in 2018.

EASA is not the only agency bringing its regulatory library into the current tech age. The FAA’s Dynamic Regulatory System materialized in response to an FAA-industry regulatory consistency committee recommendation. A 2014 Government Accountability Office report indicated that the “master source” would consolidate all certification and flight standards, rules and guidance material for easy access. At a subsequent congressional hearing, FAA representatives stated that the project was “on schedule.” No word yet on its expected release date. 

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