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EASA’s 2020 vision proposes radical safety reforms

Struggling European Union (EU) countries could delegate control of their aviation safety powers to other authorities, if recommendations by regulator EASA are implemented. As part of its Vision 2020: The Future of the Aviation Regulatory System, EASA proposes that should a country have a “lack of resources or expertise” when overseeing safety issues, then it could hand over oversight to an authority in another country. The scope of EASA’s powers would also grow should the 2020 plan be implemented.

Struggling European Union (EU) countries could delegate control of their aviation safety powers to other authorities, if recommendations by regulator EASA are implemented.

As part of its Vision 2020: The Future of the Aviation Regulatory System, EASA proposes that should a country have a “lack of resources or expertise” when overseeing safety issues, then it could hand over oversight to an authority in another country.

The scope of EASA’s powers would also grow should the 2020 plan be implemented.

Following a consultation, which launched in September of last year, the Vision 2020 also includes proposals that recommend expanding the body’s remit to cover more aviation areas including ground handling, drones and security.

The suggestions are to be sent to the European Commission which will use it as an input for the amendment of its aviation safety rules during 2015…

Patrick Ky, EASA’s executive director, said: “EASA, that means the agency and its sister national authorities, need to be prepared for the challenges ahead. With these changes, we will be more proportional, flexible and proactive to increase the level of safety in European aviation”.

Ky believes EASA’s proposals, while ambitious, are also reasonable targets, adding: “there is nothing wrong with being ambitious about safety”.

While the EASA’s proposals it’s hard to argue with its suggestions considering the perilous financial state of some EU member countries. 

Measures to prevent the overlooking of crucial safety issues, still unequivocally the industry’s number one priority, help ensure no stone is left unturned in maintaining commercial air travel safety.

Given EASA’s resources, assisting underfunded agencies beset by a lack of resources or manpower could well be one of its most effective reforms to date.

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