The European Commission and the UK government continue to negotiate withdrawal, an act that will significantly alter UK cooperation with the European Aviation Safety Agency. Vchalup
The European Commission and the UK government continue to negotiate withdrawal, an act that will significantly alter UK cooperation with the European Aviation Safety Agency.

European Commission Details Potential Brexit Repercussions

As the UK withdrawal from EU rules approaches, the aviation maintenance industry faces increased uncertainty about European markets post-Brexit.

Printed heading: Keep Calm and Negotiate

As March 30, 2019—the date the UK will withdraw from EU rules—approaches, the aviation maintenance industry faces increased uncertainty about European markets post-Brexit.

A European Commission Notice to Stakeholders reiterates the potential fallout once EU aviation safety rules cease to apply to the UK. Effects would include invalidation of UK-based organization approvals (issued on the basis of EU provisions) and UK-based European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) design organization certifications, type certificates and design approvals.

Vchalup

The European Commission and the UK government continue to negotiate withdrawal, an act that will significantly alter UK cooperation with the European Aviation Safety Agency.

 

As negotiators work to minimize negative outcomes, a March 2018 UK-EU agreement gives industry representatives and government ministers through 2020 to negotiate the terms of transition. The extended timeline paves the way for the UK to maintain its participation in EASA for another 2.5 years.

“We welcome that aviation is a priority in the negotiations and look forward to discussions on future market access beginning as soon as possible,” Airlines UK Chief Executive Tim Alderslade said after meeting with government leaders in late April. “We are confident there will be a deal that secures open and liberal aviation arrangements beyond 2020, for the benefit of all European consumers.”

Consensus is that the UK will strike bilateral agreements with its neighbors and international partners to retain the status quo post-withdrawal. 

In the meantime, EASA has stated it will “continue its cooperation with the UK authorities [. . .] as defined in the Basic Regulation, including certification, standardization and rulemaking.” The UK will continue to participate in EASA activities and retain its voting rights until its official withdrawal. 

 

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